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Taro cake

October 18, 2010

Taro cake

It was Alan’s 22nd birthday and he special ordered this cake. Taro frosting, real taro filling and egg pudding so he said and so he did received. 7 layers and 10 eggs. This was my first time making sponge cake. I’m not sure if this is the best recipe for sponge cake or if my technique was incorrect. Also, note on the egg pudding: I got a brilliant idea at 2 am to use the same cheesecake pan I used for the sponge cake for the egg pudding. I mean, same size right? Would make my life easier later when stacking? Wrong. The egg pudding seeped through the sides and half of it fell to the kitchen floor like a waterfall. You’d be better off using a regular pan and letting the egg pudding set in the refrigerator and then cutting it to fit the shape of your cake.

What is taro?
It is a perennial, tropical plant primarily grown as a root vegetable for its edible starchy corm, and as a leaf vegetable and is considered a staple in African, Oceanic, and Asian cultures. In Taiwan, it is popular in a sweet, cold desserts, fried as chips and in fried taro balls.
The plant is inedible when raw and considered toxic due to the presence of calcium oxalate crystals. The toxin is minimized by cooking. The starch is easily digestible and grains are fine and small and often used for baby food. The leaves are a good source of vitamins A and C and contain more protein than the corms.
Caution to those with sensitive skin, raw and undercooked taro can cause extremely unpleasant itching on your hands and in your mouth. Be sure to handle with gloves and cook thoroughly. [Photo source]

Taro cake.

Sponge Cake
http://www.lafujimama.com
4 large eggs, white and yolks separated
9.5 tablespoons Domino granulated sugar, sifted once
3 tablespoons milk, at room temperature
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
14 tablespoons cake flour, sifted 3 times
2.3 tablespoons butter, melted

  • Preheat oven to 350F. Line circular cake pan with parchment paper or grease with butter, then lightly coat the pan with flour. I used Bakers Joy Nonstick spray.
  • Add sugar to the egg whites, and beat the egg whites until they are stiff and glossy.
  • Add the egg yolks to the egg white mixture, and gently whisk until the yolks are incorporated.
  • Add the milk, vanilla extract, and flour (in that order) to the batter and gently fold them into the batter with a spatula. Fold in the melted butter until it is well combined.
  • Pour the cake batter into the prepared cake pan, and get rid of any air bubbles in the batter by dropping the pan on the counter once or twice. Bake the cake for 25 to 30 minutes. The cake is done when it is golden brown and springs back when pressed lightly. Let the cake cool completely on a wire rack. Run a blade around the inside of the pan to loosen the cake, and remove.

Taro filling
450g peeled giant taro
1.5 TB unsalted butter, melted
9~10 TB Domino sugar
3 TB coffee creamer

  • Cut taro into think slices and steam/boil until softened.
  • Use a fork to mash the slices until you get the consistency you wish. Depending on whether you want a chunky filling or a smooth filling.
  • Mix in unsalted butter, sugar, and coffee creamer while taro filling is still hot.
  • Allow to cool down.

Egg pudding
1 1/2 cup water
1 1/2 cup milk
2 packets unflavored gelatin
6 egg yolks
3/4 cup Domino granulated sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract

  • Bring water and milk to a boil. Pour in sugar and stir until dissolved.
  • Allow to cool slightly and pour in gelatin. Stir until dissolved.
  • In another bowl, beat egg yolks and pour into the water and milk mixture. Add vanilla extract.
  • Pour mixture through a sieve.
  • Put into mold and allow to cool before placing in the refrigerator. Chill for at least 2 hours.

Whipped cream frosting
1 cup cold heavy whipping cream
2 cups Domino confectioners’ sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 c taro powder

  • In a mixing bowl, beat the cold heavy whipping cream until slightly thicken.
  • Sift in confectioners’ sugar and whisk until stiff peaks.
  • Flavor with vanilla extract and taro powder.

WRITTEN BY:

Jane Ko is the founder and editor in chef of the food blog, A Taste of Koko. She is a blogger, food photographer, social media ninja, pastry chef, recipe tester, and brand developer. Currently resides in Austin, Texas with her Maltese puppy, Basil.

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