Desserts

Caramel apples

October 18, 2010

“Any fool can count the seeds in an apple. Only God can count all the apples in one seed.” -Robert Schuller

Caramel apples

According to the Newark Evening News: William W. Kolb invented the red candy apple. Kolb, a veteran Newark candy-maker, produced his first batch of candied apples in 1908. While experimenting in his candy shop with red cinnamon candy for the Christmas trade, he dipped some apples into the mixture and put them in the windows for display. He sold the whole first batch for 5 cents each and later sold thousands yearly. [Source: wikipedia]. Traditional candy apples are coated with a hard coating of cooled sugar syrup that is usually tinted red and sometimes flavored with cinnamon. I opted for the more gourmet versions, check out my variations below.

Caramel Apples.

1 package Kraft Premium Caramel Bits
1 cup toasted walnuts
4 oz melting chocolate, white or milk
Popsicle sticks
Sprinkles, optional

  • Wash and dry apples. Set them out on a piece of parchment paper on a baking pan.
  • Unwrap caramels and put into a pot. Bring to a very slight boil.
  • Stir the caramel until all is melted. Be very careful that it doesn’t burn. Sugar burns a lot faster than water.
  • Allow to cool the caramel cool. Meanwhile, stick popsicle sticks through the apples.
  • Dip apples in caramel or chocolate, place on parchment paper and pop into the refrigerator for 10 minutes to harden.

Pink apple.
For Breast Cancer Awareness Month

  • Dip apple into melted milk chocolate.
  • Allow to harden on parchment paper in refrigerator.
  • Tint white chocolate with pink food coloring.
  • Pipe pink white chocolate all over apple.
  • Allow to harden on parchment paper in refrigerator.

Pearl apple.

  • Dip apple into melted milk chocolate.
  • Allow the chocolate to slightly set at room temperature.
  • Press candy pearls into the chocolate.
  • Allow to harden on parchment paper in
  • refrigerator.

Halloween apple.

  • Dip apple into melted milk chocolate.
  • Allow the chocolate to slightly set at room temperature.
  • Coat with sprinkles.
  • Allow to harden on parchment paper in
  • refrigerator.

Caramel apple.

  • Dip apple into caramel. If the caramel has become too hard, heat it up and add 1 or 2 tbsp of water until it becomes a more liquid consistency.
  • Turn the apple and make sure the caramel has evenly coated the apple.
  • Spray nonstick baking oil on parchment paper before placing the caramel coated apple. Caramel is super sticky. You will lose some of the caramel to the paper if you don’t oil it beforehand.
  • Allow to harden on parchment paper in refrigerator.

Side note: You can make your own caramel but I made mine the night before for my students so I opted for the easy way out. Kraft Caramel Bits made it quick and easy. The only con was having to tediously unwrapped each individual caramel from it’s plastic wrapping. I have some coupons for $0.50 off Kraft Caramel Bits, message me if you want me to mail them out to you!
Photography tip: If you photograph your apples under direct sunlight for more than 5 minutes, the chocolate will start sliding off. I noticed the chocolate started to get glossy and then to my horror, start dripping down the sides of the apples. I have 6 chocolate and caramel stains on my whiteboard now.

WRITTEN BY:

Jane Ko is the founder and editor in chef of the food blog, A Taste of Koko. She is a blogger, food photographer, social media ninja, pastry chef, recipe tester, and brand developer. Currently resides in Austin, Texas with her Maltese puppy, Basil.

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