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Pork & Shrimp Dumplings

February 02, 2011

Happy Chinese New Year! 新年快樂!

Photo credit: Patrick Lu

There are many different kinds of foods cooked during Chinese New Year but dumplings are the standard because they represent wealth and a profitable future. Back in time, Chinese currency consisted of silver and gold ingots called yuan bao that had the similar shape of a dumpling.

Dumplings are one of the easiest things to make and are entirely customizable to your liking. As in, you can make the filling to include ingredients that you like. I added ground pork to the shrimp mixture because shrimp by itself is very lean. It needs something fatty with substance to bind it together so I incorporated ground pork.

Dumpling night. Photo credit: Patrick Lu

Making dumplings can seem tedious but believe me, it’s a lot more tastier than store bought especially since you know what’s going into the dumpling and it’s much more fresh. You can even invite some friends over and turn it into a dumpling night!

Pork & shrimp dumplings.

Ingredients

90-100 dumpling wrappers
1 1/2 lb ground pork
1 lb shrimp, peeled, deveiened, coarsely chopped
1/4 c ginger root, minced
4 stalks green onion, finely chopped
5 large napa cabbage leaves, finely chopped
5 tbsp soy sauce
4 tbsp sesame oil
3 tbsp corn starch

  • Combine ground pork, shrimp, ginger root, green onion and cabbage leaves into a bowl. Using your hands, mix the ingredients until well incorporated.
  • Add soy sauce, sesame oil and corn starch. Using your hands once again, mix the ingredients. Don’t worry about over mixing. The meat will be more juicy and tender.
  • Prepare the dumpling wrappers. Using a spoon or chopsticks, put about no more than a tablespoon of filling in the center of the dumpling wrapper.
  • Using water or beaten egg white, line the edge of the dumpling wrapper, fold in half, and pinch the edges closed. Double check that there’s no opens or else your filling will come out when you boil the dumplings. Also try not to include any air bubbles inside the dumpling.
  • Repeat process with remaining filling and dumpling wrappers.
  • Bring a pot of water to a boil.
  • Put in a reasonable number of dumplings that will fit in the pot without any overcrowding.
  • Boil for about 10 minutes until the dumplings float to the top and are translucent. 

If want to save the dumplings for later, you can package them up in a freezer bag up to 3 months. I highly suggest dusting with a light coat of flour so the dumplings don’t stick to one another.

Enjoy alone or serve with soy sauce!

A Taste of Koko’s favorite dumpling sauce.

3 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp sesame oil
1 tsp vinegar
1 tsp chili oil

The chili oil on the right is my favorite brand!

Tips/Side notes:

  • Prevent your dumpling wrappers from drying out by covering with a moist cheesecloth or paper towel.
  • You can do fancy creases and folds on your dumplings. I like to keep my simple. Also because if you have a lot of creases, sometimes the dumplings don’t get cooked evenly.
  • There are many different variations of fillings. It depends on what you like such as ground beef, garlic, mushrooms, onions, rice wine ect.. 

I have some exciting news.. I finally got around to creating my YouTube Channel and my first video is a demonstration on how to make these dumplings! I figured since Chinese New Year is also technically the start of a ‘new year’, why not add some new features to A Taste of Koko?

I have no idea how YouTubers do it. Videotaping, voice auditing, editing, ect.. is hard work. Blogging is so much easier. I had to refilm many times, especially since lighting is much more finicky on a video camera than on a DSLR. Also, I always knew I was a camera shy person but who knew I’d be even more shy on video camera. Nevertheless, please leave me comments & critique. I want to hear the good and the ugly!

I hope everyone is staying warm && Happy Chinese New Year! Back when I was a little kid, we use to say to each other ‘恭禧發財, 紅包拿來,’ which means ‘Congratulations and be prosperous, now give me a red envelope!’ 🙂

WRITTEN BY:

Jane Ko is the founder and editor in chef of the food blog, A Taste of Koko. She is a blogger, food photographer, social media ninja, pastry chef, recipe tester, and brand developer. Currently resides in Austin, Texas with her Maltese puppy, Basil.

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